Tuesday July 29, 2014

Slashdot: New Findings On Graphene As a Conductor With IC Components

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:52 AWST)

ClockEndGooner (1323377) writes Philadelphia's NPR affiliate, WHYY FM, reported today on their Newsworks program that a research team at the University of Pennsylvania have released their preliminary findings on the use of graphene as a conductor in the next generation of computer chips. From the article: "'It's very, very strong mechanically, and it is an excellent electronic material that might be used in future computer chips,' said Charlie Johnson, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Pennsylvania. ... Future graphene transistors, Johnson said, are likely to be only tens of atoms across."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: Crysis Warhead 0.1 (GNOME Icon Theme)

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:21 AWST)

ThumbnailCrysis Warhead 0.1
(GNOME Icon Theme)

Crysis Warhead GTK Icon Theme by Tuxkernel

Based in SE-Interface-V2_Red by Naf71

http://naf71.deviantart.com/art/Se-Interface-V2-Red-197662478

Graphic installation:

Right click on the desktop and select \"change background\". Now go to \"Theme\" and select \"Install\". Select Crysis_Warhead.tar.gz and to open. Apply new theme. That\'s all

Manual installation:

Download the theme, untar and copy in /home/YOURUSERNAME/.icons

That\'s all

Enjoy!

Tuxkernel...

NOTE: Crysis Warhead icons were designed by The Skins Factory and are property of Crytek.Inc. All right reserved.

changelog:

* Fix Mimetypes (Thanks to Dariusz Marek, A.K.A Dareksmok for detect the bug)

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SC Magazine: ABC to make the switch to cloud email

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:17 AWST)

As budget pressures descend.

Slashdot: The Misleading Fliers Comcast Used To Kill Off a Local Internet Competitor

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:10 AWST)

Jason Koebler (3528235) writes In the months and weeks leading up to a referendum vote that would have established a locally owned fiber network in three small Illinois cities, Comcast and SBC (now AT&T) bombarded residents and city council members with disinformation, exaggerations, and outright lies to ensure the measure failed. The series of two-sided postcards painted municipal broadband as a foolhardy endeavor unfit for adults, responsible people, and perhaps as not something a smart woman would do. Municipal fiber was a gamble, a high-wire act, a game, something as "SCARY" as a ghost. Why build a municipal fiber network, one asked, when "internet service [is] already offered by two respectable private businesses?" In the corner, in tiny print, each postcard said "paid for by SBC" or "paid for by Comcast." The postcards are pretty absurd and worth a look.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: Alienware-Invader 0.1 (GNOME Icon Theme)

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:02 AWST)

ThumbnailAlienware-Invader 0.1
(GNOME Icon Theme)

Alienware Invader GTK Icon Theme, ported by Tuxkernel

Based in SE-Interface-Blue by Naf71

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Se-Interface+%28Orange%2C+Blue+%26+Yellow%29+?content=118239

HIGHLIGHTS:

* \"places\" was totally rebuilded.

Enjoy it!!!

Tuxkernel...

This theme looks better with:

* Alienware Invader DEMO GTK Theme

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Alienware-Invader+Demo?content=118435

* Alienware Invader GNOMenu Theme

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Alienware+Invader?content=158600

* Alienware Invader X11 Mouse theme

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/AlienWareInvader?content=104654

* Conky Tech-Mon Reloaded

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Conky+Tech-Mon+Reloaded?content=158576

or Conky Sentinel 1.6

http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php/Conky+Sentinel?content=153563

* and Alienware Firefox Persona

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/alienware_fan/

changelog:

* Fix Mimetypes (Thanks to Dariusz Marek, A.K.A Dareksmok for detect the bug)

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SC Magazine: Microsoft targeted in Chinese government inquiry

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 05:00 AWST)

Officials descend on offices unannounced.

GNOME Look: ULx MOD 1.0 (Beryl Emerald Theme)

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 04:31 AWST)

ThumbnailULx MOD 1.0
(Beryl Emerald Theme)
ULX is origionally a plugin for GMOD servers that allows one to display a MOTD popup upon connecting to a server. I wanted to have the MOTD window theme as my actual window theme, so I made an almost exact clone for Emerald.

Their page:
http://www.facepunch.com/threads/1088350-ULX-v3.51-Advanced-Admin-Mod

Looks best with the GTK theme Greybird

changelog:
1. Released

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Slashdot: A Fictional Compression Metric Moves Into the Real World

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 04:31 AWST)

Tekla Perry (3034735) writes The 'Weissman Score' — created for HBO's "Silicon Valley" to add dramatic flair to the show's race to build the best compression algorithm — creates a single score by considering both the compression ratio and the compression speed. While it was created for a TV show, it does really work, and it's quickly migrating into academia. Computer science and engineering students will begin to encounter the Weissman Score in the classroom this fall."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








SC Magazine: Customs appoints new CIO, disbands CTO in restructure

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 04:24 AWST)

Noble removed from IT to lead merger, Brugeaud promoted.

Slashdot: A Credit Card-Sized, Arduino-Based Game Device (Video)

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 03:50 AWST)

Slashdot's Tim Lord was cruising the halls at OSCON, where he spotted Kevin Bates and his tiny Arduino-based device, called the Arduboy. On Kevin's Tindie.com sales page, he says the games it can run include, "Space Rocks, Snake, Flappy Ball, Chess, Breakout, and many more...The most exciting one could be made by you!" || His work with Arduboy got Kevin invited to the recent White House Maker Faire, where he rubbed shoulders (and shot selfies with) Bill Nye the Science Guy, Will.i.am from the Black Eyed Peas, and Arduino creator Massimo Banzi. || Does Kevin have a Kickstarter in the works? There's nothing about Arduboy on Kickstarter.com, and given the Arduboy's simplicity and low price (currently $50), plus stories about it everywhere from Time.com to engadget to Slashdot, he may not need any financing or capital to make his idea succeed. (Alternate Video Link)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: risolve-update-v-4.sh v-4 (Nautilus Script)

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 03:26 AWST)

risolve-update-v-4.sh v-4
(Nautilus Script)
If you have trouble updating you just run the script in gnome-terminal that will solve the problems automatically, only in one case will be asked for your assistance in a very simple.
Work with Ubuntu from 10.04 to 14.04
Run in Terminal and wait.

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Slashdot: Ask Slashdot: Preparing an Android Tablet For Resale?

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 03:07 AWST)

UrsaMajor987 (3604759) writes I have a Asus Transformer tablet that I dropped on the floor. There is no obvious sign of damage but It will no longer boot. Good excuse to get a newer model. I intend to sell it for parts (it comes with an undamaged keyboard) or maybe just toss it. I want to remove all my personal data. I removed the flash memory card but what about the other storage? I know how to wipe a hard drive, but how do you wipe a tablet? If you were feeling especially paranoid, but wanted to keep the hardware intact for the next user, what would you do?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Digital Photography School: The Only Three Lenses You Need for Travel Photography

Digital Photography School (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 03:00 AWST)

The only three lenses you need for travel photography anywhere in the world are a fisheye lens, a 50mm, and a 135mm (or similar telephoto).

You can agree and finish this article right here, or you can read on to see exactly why I would choose only these three lenses to take with me anywhere in the world.

Canon fisheye 15mm 2.8

Night shot from atop a bridge in Moscow, using the Canon fisheye 15mm f/2.8

Before I say anything else, the fisheye I have in mind has an aperture of f/2.8, the 50mm has an aperture of f/1.4, and the 135 has an aperture of f/2.0. Popular, cheaper variations on these lenses would be the 24mm f/2.8, 50mm f/1.8, and the 100mm f/2.8 Macro. I’d also like to address what I imagine a popular response to this article might be: “What about the 24-105mm?” This lens is weak for a couple of reasons. The maximum aperture on this lens is f/4, which ends up being very limiting if you are trying to travel light (and going without an off camera flash).  Also, prime lenses are always superior in quality to zoom lenses. There are less moving parts and the image quality is cleaner. If you think having just one lens to cover a greater range is easier, just remember what you gain in convenience (by having one lens) you lose in quality, weight, and ability to “see” in the dark.

Each of these lenses are used for very specific reasons. Just as we wear different shoes for different purposes throughout our week, such as; sneakers for exercise, dress shoes for work, and slippers around the house – we use different lenses to convey different feelings, emotions, and to use as different tools to capture our experiences. Some lenses really are better than others for certain things. For example, portraits are best taken with lenses between 85mm and 135mm. The distortion to the face/ears is minimized and the truest proportions are found in this range.

On the other hand, you wouldn’t normally reach for a lens like this when shooting a landscape scene (there are always exceptions to every rule, and it’s fun to see what happens when you break the general guidelines). Great lenses for landscapes tend to be a bit wider, somewhere between 15mm and 50mm. I recently took only these three lenses with me on the Trans Siberian Railway from Russia through Mongolia into China. Here are MY reasons for bringing the 15mm Fisheye, 50mm f/1.4, and the Canon 135mm f/2.0 with me on this trip of a lifetime.

The Canon Fisheye 15mm f/2.8

canon fisheye 15mm

From Moscow, Russia

The Canon 15mm lens is my antidote to boring building pictures. When traveling abroad (or around your own town/city/village), interesting buildings are inevitably photographed. Oh, that old bridge with locks attached to it? Better take a picture. Oh, look at that old cathedral in the Kremlin, better take a picture. If it’s there, it must be important. Well, you can add your photo to 1.5 million other photographs right there on Flickr or Google images that look exactly like the one you just took.

What will you do to differentiate yourself? How can you take a picture that will make someone pause for more than half a second?  Ad companies are excited when someone spends 4-8 seconds looking at a photo. Can you get someone to look at one photo for that long? What would it take? For me, I decided I would never take boring, straight photos of buildings ever again. I’d either edit them in unusual ways (like creating an HDR image, or process it in very contrasted black and white), at unusual times of day, or I would attempt to photograph it differently than every other tourist before me.

canon fisheye 15mm

The subways in Moscow, Russia

Canon fisheye 15mm 2.8

Selfies are easy with the fisheye lens. That bag on my shoulder could hold my camera, three lenses, my laptop, batteries, some magazines and a book.

Shooting with a fisheye lens can be really fun, actually. Hold your camera up to your eye with a fisheye lens on, move the camera upwards and watch the horizon bend down sharply at the sides, creating a “globe” feel to your image. Tilt the camera down and watch the earth curve up like a big “U”. Buildings become warped and distorted in unusual ways, like a piece of Gaudi’s architecture. Stand in the middle of the street and point the camera straight upwards and watch the buildings on the side loom over you, like in a Dr. Seuss book.

canon fisheye 15mm

My bunkmates on the Trans Siberian Railway

Fisheye lenses can capture an entire room, cabin of a train, or a bathroom easily. They make selfies on your DSLR incredibly easy. You can take incredible photos of the stars at night. And best of all, they are great for doing the Camera Toss. (I suppose I should recommend NOT trying this ever, anywhere). Fisheye lenses add an element of fun and whimsy to travel photos, which I find otherwise a bit boring and predictable. It’s also an incredibly light and compact lens to travel with, which is why I always bring it along on my trips now.

canon fisheye 15mm

My camera toss, where I throw my camera with a fisheye lens high up into the air to capture a scene like this

The 50mm f/1.4

The 50mm lens is a standard, go-to, all-around lens. And while the Fisheye lens brings a lot of whimsy and fun to my travel pictures, some scenes just don’t call for that. I’ve heard it said that the 50mm is the closest representation to what we see naturally with our eyes. This lens is my best choice of the three options for Canon 50mm lenses. For only about $300, this lens has fantastic optics and a powerful aperture. It’s made of real glass lenses unlike the cheaper, lower quality 50mm f/1.8. And it focuses fast, unlike the much more expensive 50mm f/1.2, which happens to be twice as heavy.

Canon 50mm 1.4

A garden scene in Moscow, Russia taken with the 50mm f/1.4. Such lovely bokeh!

This is a great, inconspicuous lens on a camera body because it doesn’t stick out too much like a 70-200mm would, and the quality is just superb, as I’ve already said. It is extremely lightweight, and you could honestly walk around the entire day with just this lens. What I associate most with the 50mm f/1.4 lens is street photography. I love to take that lens and get lost down side streets and alleyways. I like to take photos of strangers on the street with this lens. The focal length is just right, so it feels as though the viewer is standing there by him or herself. It captures just enough of a scene to convey what is there.

Canon 50mm 1.4

A retired math teacher from Texas on the Trans Siberian Railway

The 50mm f/1.4 is also a great lens for portraits (though I prefer the 135mm f/2.0). It produces lovely bokeh. It forces you to get up close to your subject, making the portrait more intimate. You can’t hide behind a telephoto like the 135mm or a 70-200mm. You are an arm’s distance away, and being that close sometimes shows up on the subject’s face in interesting ways.

low light with the Canon 50mm 1.4

My Mongolian host preparing milk tea in the yurt.

The last thing that I think the 50mm f/1.4 does best, is capture images in low light situations. Trying to capture dinner in a restaurant at night using candlelight only? Totally possible. That light reflecting across the river at night? 50mm does it best! Sleeping in yurts for four nights in a row? Getting that delicious yurt light from the top of the tent is easy with the 50mm.

Canon 50mm 1.4

Taken in the back alleys of Beijing, China with my 50mm lens, my favorite street photography lens.

Fun fact: of my top 200 images from the trip, 112 of them were taken with the 50mm.

The 135mm f/2.0

The granddaddy of all these lenses, the 135mm f/2.0 has a special POW feel to it. Because it is a telephoto, it pulls the background in for a nice compact feel to the images. It is a great portrait lens as it completely obliterates the background in a sea of dreamy bokeh. And one special fact about the Canon 135mm f/2.0: it has the ability to focus at a distance of 1 meter (3 feet), which makes it almost like a macro lens.

Canon 135mm 2.0

My host on the left, after we road horseback from one village to the next, in Mongolia. Taken with the 135mm f/2.0

This lens is fun for me because it has similar properties to the 70-200mm, but it weighs nearly half as much, which will save your back and shoulders after a long day of walking around. This is a fun lens to spy on people from afar, if you are afraid of the straight-on street style encounters you get with the 50mm. This is actually a really interesting lens to do landscapes with if you have enough room. Look at this side-by-side comparison of basically the two same scenes, and look what the 135mm does to the mountains and landscape in the background. It really pulls them towards you, the viewer and truly implies the scope of the scene.

Fisheye versus 135mm

The same view from the fisheye and the 135mm. Notice the mountain with the bright spot in the background of the fisheye; it’s almost non-existent. With the telephoto the mountain becomes a major player in the photo.

Canon 135mm 2.0

Taken on my way to the oldest and deepest freshwater lake in the world. Lake Baikal, in Siberia, Russia.

canon 135mm 2.0

In the Kremlin, Moscow, Russia. This is one instance where I enjoy breaking the rules and using a telephoto lens to capture an idea of a building, rather than the whole thing with a 50mm or Fisheye lens.

I hope these images and words have inspired you. It’s really fun to limit yourself to prime lenses and feel how they work (and don’t work) in various situations. Being that close to just a few lenses over a month of travel really allows you to get to know the equipment well. So now let’s see some travel photos you’ve taken with prime lenses!

The post The Only Three Lenses You Need for Travel Photography by appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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DP Review: Pelican Imaging releases light field photos from its mobile imaging array

DP Review (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 02:47 AWST)

Pelican Imaging has released a set of re-focusable pictures taken with its light field camera for smartphones. Instead of placing an array of microlenses between the sensor and the main lens, Pelican uses an array of main lenses - each with a sensor behind it. Pelican's offering is more suitable for smartphones, and their sample images allow for re-focusing, changing DOF, and shifting perspective. Click through for more details and links to the images.

Slashdot: Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 02:26 AWST)

Bennett Haselton writes: I can't stand switching from a slideout-keyboard phone to a touchscreen phone, and my own informal online survey found a slight majority of people who prefer slideout keyboards even more than I do. Why will no carrier make them available, at any price, except occasionally as the crummiest low-end phones in the store? Bennett's been asking around, of store managers and users, and arrives at even more perplexing questions. Read on, below.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: US States Edge Toward Cryptocoin Regulation

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 01:45 AWST)

SonicSpike points out an article from the Pew Charitable Trusts' Research & Analysis department on the legislation and regulation schemes emerging in at least a few states in reaction to the increasing use of digital currencies like Bitcoin. A working group called the Conference of State Bank Supervisors’ Emerging Payments Task Force has been surveying the current landscape of state rules and approaches to digital currencies, a topic on which state laws are typically silent. In April, the task force presented a model consumer guidance to help states provide consumers with information about digital currencies. A number of states, including California, Massachusetts and Texas, have issued warnings to consumers that virtual currencies are not subject to “traditional regulation or monetary policy,” including insurance, bonding and other security measures, and that values can fluctuate dramatically. ... The article focuses on the high-population, big-economy states of New York, California and Texas, with a touch of Kansas -- but other states are sure to follow. Whether you live in the U.S. or not, are there government regulations that you think would actually make sense for digital currencies?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Internet Census 2012 Data Examined: Authentic, But Chaotic and Unethical

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 01:03 AWST)

An anonymous reader writes "A team of researchers at the TU Berlin and RWTH Aachen presented an analysis of the Internet Census 2012 data set (here's the PDF) in the July edition of the ACM Sigcomm Computer Communication Review journal. After its release on March 17, 2013 by an anonymous author, the Internet Census data created an immediate media buzz, mainly due to its unethical data collection methodology that exploited default passwords to form the Carna botnet. The now published analysis suggests that the released data set is authentic and not faked, but also reveals a rather chaotic picture. The Census suffers from a number of methodological flaws and also lacks meta-data information, which renders the data unusable for many further analyses. As a result, the researchers have not been able to verify several claims that the anonymous author(s) made in the published Internet Census report. The researchers also point to similar but legal efforts measuring the Internet and remark that the illegally measured Internet Census 2012 is not only unethical but might have been overrated by the press."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: Conformity (Other GNOME Wallpaper)

(posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 00:33 AWST)

ThumbnailConformity
(Other GNOME Wallpaper)


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Slashdot: Oracle Offers Custom Intel Chips and Unanticipated Costs

Slashdot (posted on Tuesday July 29, 2014 at 00:22 AWST)

jfruh (300774) writes "For some time, Intel has been offering custom-tweaked chips to big customers. While most of the companies that have taken them up on this offer, like Facebook and eBay, put the chips into servers meant for internal use, Oracle will now be selling systems running on custom Xeons directly to end users. Those customers need to be careful about how they configure those systems, though: in the new Oracle 12c, the in-memory database option, which costs $23,000 per processor, is turned on by default."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Monday July 28, 2014

Slashdot: Attackers Install DDoS Bots On Amazon Cloud

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 23:40 AWST)

itwbennett (1594911) writes "Attackers are exploiting a vulnerability in distributed search engine software Elasticsearch to install DDoS malware on Amazon and possibly other cloud servers. Last week security researchers from Kaspersky Lab found new variants of Mayday, a Trojan program for Linux that's used to launch distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. The malware supports several DDoS techniques, including DNS amplification. One of the new Mayday variants was found running on compromised Amazon EC2 server instances, but this is not the only platform being misused, said Kaspersky Lab researcher Kurt Baumgartner Friday in a blog post."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Google's Mapping Contest Draws Ire From Indian Government

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 23:01 AWST)

hypnosec writes with news that India's Central Bureau of Investigation has ordered a preliminary enquiry (PE) against Google for violating Indian laws by mapping sensitive areas and defence installations in the country. As per the PE, registered on the basis of a complaint made by the Surveyor General of India's office to the Union Home Ministry, Google has been accused of organizing a mapping competition dubbed 'Mapathon' in February-March 2013 without taking prior permission from Survey of India, country's official mapping agency. The mapping competition required citizens to map their neighbourhoods, especially details related to hospitals and restaurants. The Survey of India (SoI), alarmed by the event, asked the company to share its event details. While going through the details the watchdog found that there were several coordinates having details of sensitive defence installations which are out of the public domain."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Stanford Team Creates Stable Lithium Anode Using Honeycomb Film

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 22:23 AWST)

puddingebola (2036796) writes "A team at Stanford has created a stable Lithium anode battery using a carbon honeycomb film. The film is described as a nanosphere layer that allows for the expansion of Lithium during use, and is suitable as a barrier between anode and cathode. Use of a lithium anode improves the coulombic efficiency and could result in longer range batteries for cars." The linked article suggests that the 200-mile-range, $25,000 electric car is a more realistic concept with batteries made with this technology, though some people are more interested in super-capacity phone batteries.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: Pidgin QIP like smiles (Other GNOME Stuff)

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 22:09 AWST)

ThumbnailPidgin QIP like smiles
(Other GNOME Stuff)
This is QIP like emotes theme for Pidgin.

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Digital Photography School: Ten Go-to Editing Tips for Using Photoshop

Digital Photography School (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 22:00 AWST)

PS CC launch

The recent release of Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud (CC) 2014 (which is the 15th release of the product) got me thinking about my own workflow. Photoshop is an amazing piece of software. I have been using it commercially since version 5. However, I don’t necessarily think the latest version is the best one. I’ve just recently upgraded to CS6 and I’m loving it but I can’t see myself going the CC route just yet, as it doesn’t suit my business model.

The beauty of this software is the power that it can bring to your images, but it is a complex piece of software and coming to grips with it as a beginner can be daunting. Time and practice will be your allies in learning Photoshop.

As a photographer, Photoshop is the main editing software package I use in my photography workflow. Every photographer or designer has their own unique approach to editing images using Photoshop. I find this fascinating.

I’m constantly refining, and tweaking my editing workflow. I get such a buzz when I find an alternative method or a shortcut, that I wasn’t aware of before, which makes things more efficient. Having said that there are a lot of the features in Photoshop I wouldn’t use, and there are some that I use more than others.

Before I start editing my images in Photoshop, I open them with Adobe Camera Raw (ACR) since I shoot RAW format. I need to make basic adjustments such as exposure, white balance, correcting chromatic aberration and any lens distortion. From there, I take my images into Photoshop as Smart Objects.

The following tips for using Photoshop are my regular editing techniques in no particular order. These can be used in most versions of Photoshop. These are a small set of useful tips. I could have extended it by a dozen more.

Ten go-to editing tips for using Photoshop

1. Duplicating Layer Masks for other Adjustment Layers

To save time when you need a copy of a mask from one layer to another adjustment layer; when you’ve used the brush tool to create a mask. Simply hold down the Option key on a Mac or CTRL key on a PC, click on the layer mask and drag it to the adjustment layer in question. This makes a copy of the layer mask without having to redo the same again.

Gorilla duplicating masks on other adjustment layers

2. Add a Curves Adjustment Layer with a Difference

Normally in the Curves adjustment, you adjust points on the curve line which affect the image’s tonal range. The S-shaped curve is a classic tonal tweak for boosting contrast and color saturation. However, if you add a curves adjustment layer, change the blend mode to Soft Light and reduce the Fill down to approximately 55% (the reduction amount will depend entirely on your image & preference), this gives a similar boost to color and contrast. For demonstration purposes, I have left the Fill at 100%, so that you can see a difference as outlined within the white square.

Field in France curves softlight

3. Dodge and Burn

Create a separate layer, change the blend mode (Mode) to Overlay and fill the layer with 50% gray. Name this layer “Dodge and Burn”. The Dodge and Burn tools are my go-to method for making selected areas of an image lighter or darker. Dodge is for lightening and the Burn tool is for darkening an area. Use a soft Brush and set Exposure to between 6-12%. In most cases, I leave Range set to Midtones. If you find that you have overdone it in the specific areas, just reduce the Opacity on the layer. The image on the right (below) shows the areas where I used the Burn tool to darken his arm, his face, and the bright spots in the background, and also where I lightened his back shoulder.

Secret Agent Dodge Burn

4. Layer Comps

I find the Layer Comps feature in Photoshop invaluable. It is a useful guide to the different editing stages as a before and after comparison. It is so easy to overdo it and get carried away with over-editing your image. This has five stages from straight out of camera, to the final image.

Poker

5. Stamp Visible

Cmd+Shift+Alt+E (Mac) or Ctrl+Alt+Shift+E on a PC is the command to keep all the layers in a Photoshop file and make a merged copy on top of them. I find this particularly useful, especially at the end of my editing process, where I apply some sharpening or contrast by using a Topaz effect (plug-in for Photoshop).

6. The “Place” Command

This is found under File>Place. I normally work with multiple images in the same document. Therefore, I find using this method really handy as it imports the image as a Smart Object automatically, which is great for resizing the image without any degradation.

7. Patch Tool

The Patch Tool was my favorite of the Healing Brush Tools in Photoshop CS5. But now that I’ve upgraded to CS6, the Patch tool has just gotten even better. You can now use the Patch tool to fill using the Content-Aware on a new empty layer. I prefer to set the Adaption to Loose. Make sure Sample All Layers has been ticked. The Healing Brush also feels more intuitive to use than before.

Ringbuoy Patch Tool

8. CMD+T or Transform

I seem to use this shortcut a lot. If I’m working on multiple images in the same document, I may need to resize one or two of the images accordingly. As I import my images using the Place command, this means they are converted to Smart Objects, so the resolution of the images isn’t affected when transforming or resizing.

9. CMD+T+Warp Tool

Similar to the above point, the Warp tool is great for fine-tuning an element of an image, especially if you are working on composites. In the image below, I was using my own stock photo of Heron’s talons to replicate the Owl’s talons for the purpose of realism.

Owl Warp tool

10. Opening a Second Window for the Same Document

When you are retouching your image to get rid of dust and blemishes and so forth, you may need to zoom in as much as 300% or more. Open another window for the same document by Window>Arrange>New window for new_filename.PSD but keep it at 25% (or fit to window). This way, instead of zooming back out to see how the image looks and then zooming back in to resume your retouching, just click on the second window where you have the same document viewed at 25% (or fit).

Do you have another other go-to Photoshop tools or tips you’d like to share? What is in your workflow? Please share in the comments.

The post Ten Go-to Editing Tips for Using Photoshop by appeared first on Digital Photography School.

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Slashdot: Build Your Own Gatling Rubber Band Machine Gun

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 21:54 AWST)

New submitter melarky (3767369) writes This is a fun weekend project that most nerds will appreciate. Step by step instructions and also a handy video will make the construction of this project fast and easy. I have seen lots of plans for sale (or actual guns/kits for sale), but couldn't seem to find any plans for free. I played around with a few different designs (even cut my first few on a homemade CNC machine) and finally landed on this design. I made the guide more accessible to the general public (no need for a CNC machine here), so if you've ever dreamed of ending friendships because of hundreds of rubber band welts, now's your chance! We'd like to see your home-made projects, too.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: World's Largest Amphibious Aircraft Goes Into Production In China

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 21:27 AWST)

stephendavion (2872091) writes "Chinese aircraft manufacturer China Aviation Industry General Aircraft (CAIGA) has started trial production of its TA600 amphibious aircraft, claimed to be the world's largest of its kind. With an expected maiden flight late next year, the Chinese plane would replace Japan's ShinMaywa US-2 short takeoff and landing (STOL) aircraft as the largest of its kind globally." Take a look at a side profile illustration of the CA-600, on this Korean language page. The TA600 has a huge maximum takeoff weight of 53.5 tons, but looks a bit puny compared to Howard Hughes' H-4 Hercules.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: The Oculus Rift DK2: In-Depth Review (and Comparison To DK1)

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 20:48 AWST)

Benz145 (1869518) writes "The hotly anticipated Oculus Rift DK2 has begun arriving at doorsteps. The DK2s enhancements include optical positional tracking and a higher resolution panel, up from 1280×800 to 1920×1080 (1080p) and moved to a pentile-matrix OLED panel for display duties. This means higher levels of resolvable detail and a much reduced screen door effect. The panel features low persistence of vision, a technology pioneered by Valve that aims to cut motion artefacts by only displaying the latest, most correct display information relative to the user's movements – as users of the DK1 will attest, its LCD panel was heavily prone to smearing, things are now much improved with the DK2."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








OpenBSD Journal: Ingo Schwarze Interviewed on BSDTalk

OpenBSD Journal (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 20:26 AWST)

The latest episode of BSDTalk involves our very own Ingo Schwarze (schwarze@):

bsdtalk243 - mandoc with Ingo Schwarze

Interview about mandoc with Ingo Schwarze. The project webpage describes mandoc as "a suite of tools compiling mdoc, the roff macro language of choice for BSD manual pages, and man, the predominant historical language for UNIX manuals."

Recorded at BSDCan 2014.

OpenBSD Journal: g2k14: Andrew Fresh on Programming Perl

OpenBSD Journal (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 20:28 AWST)

This was my first hackathon so I wasn't really sure what to do. I had some plans to possibly import perl 5.20, but I was hoping to include 5.20.1 which isn't out for at least a month and espie@ says that it is too close to lock. I will continue to push local patches upstream to get everyone using perl on OpenBSD to be using the same improvements that are in our base perl.

Read more...

Slashdot: Suddenly Visible: Illicit Drugs As Part of Silicon Valley Culture

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 20:06 AWST)

The recent death by overdose of Google executive Timothy Hayes has drawn attention to the phenomenon of illegal drug use (including abuse of prescription painkillers) among technology workers and executives in high-pay, high-stress Silicon Valley. The Mercury News takes a look at the phenomenon; do the descriptions of freely passed cocaine, Red Bull as a gateway drug, and complacent managers match your own workplace experiences? From the Mercury News article: "There's this workaholism in the valley, where the ability to work on crash projects at tremendous rates of speed is almost a badge of honor," says Steve Albrecht, a San Diego consultant who teaches substance abuse awareness for Bay Area employers. "These workers stay up for days and days, and many of them gradually get into meth and coke to keep going. Red Bull and coffee only gets them so far." ... Drug abuse in the tech industry is growing against the backdrop of a national surge in heroin and prescription pain-pill abuse. Treatment specialists say the over-prescribing of painkillers, like the opioid hydrocodone, has spawned a new crop of addicts -- working professionals with college degrees, a description that fits many of the thousands of workers in corporate Silicon Valley. Increasingly, experts see painkillers as the gateway drug for addicts, and they are in abundance. "There are 1.4 million prescriptions ... in the Bay Area for hydrocodone," says Alice Gleghorn with the San Francisco Department of Public Health. "That's a lot of pills out there."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Microsoft's Nokia Plans Come Into Better Focus

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 17:51 AWST)

Forbes has an update on what sort of future Nokia faces, as Microsoft reveals a strategy for making sense of the acquisition: [Microsoft EVP of devices Stephen] Elop laid out a framework for cost cuts in a memo to employees on July 17. Devices would focus on high and low cost Windows smartphones, suggesting a phasing out of feature phones and Android smartphones. Two business units, smart devices and mobile phones, would become one, thereby cutting overlap and overhead. Microsoft would reduce engineering in Beijing and San Diego and unwind engineering in Oulu, Finland. It would exit manufacturing in Komarom, Hungary; shift to lower cost areas like Manaus, Brazil and Reynosa, Mexico; and reduce manufacturing in Beijing and Dongguan, China. Also, CEO Satya Nadella gave hints about how Microsoft will make money on Nokia during Tuesday' conference call. Devices, he said, "go beyond" hardware and are about productivity. "I can take my Office Lens App, use the camera on the phone, take a picture of anything, and have it automatically OCR recognized and into OneNote in searchable fashion. There is a lot we can do with phones by broadly thinking about productivity." In other words, the sale of a smartphone is a means to other sales.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








GNOME Look: Old Car 1.0 (GNOME Wallpaper 1600x1200)

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 17:10 AWST)

ThumbnailOld Car 1.0
(GNOME Wallpaper 1600x1200)
Please, go to the download page and choose the size:
http://wallpaper.soa-admin.eu/show-0000000371.html

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GNOME Look: Old Car 1.0 (GNOME Wallpaper 1600x1200)

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 17:08 AWST)

ThumbnailOld Car 1.0
(GNOME Wallpaper 1600x1200)
Please, go to the download page and choose the size:
http://wallpaper.soa-admin.eu/show-0000000371.html

[read more]

job recommendations:
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DFES Emergency Alerts: Bushfire ADVICE for five kilometres south of Roebuck Plains Roadhouse in the Shire of Broome

DFES Emergency Alerts (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 16:10 AWST)

Category: Fire
Alert Summary: A bushfire ADVICE has been issued for people travelling on Great Northern Highway, five kilometres south of Roebuck Plains Roadhouse, in the Shire of Broome.
Content:
A bushfire ADVICE has been issued for people travelling on Great Northern Highway, five kilometres south of Roebuck Plains Roadhouse, in the Shire of Broome.
 
  • There is no threat to lives or homes but there is a lot of smoke in the area.
  • Although there is no immediate danger you need to be aware and keep up to date in case the situation changes.
  • The fire started along Great Northern Highwayand is burning in the Roebuck Plains.
 
BUSHFIRE BEHAVIOUR:
  • The bushfire is moving slowly in a westerly direction.
  • It is out of control and unpredictable.
 
WHAT TO DO:
  • Be extremely careful when driving through the area.
  • Turn your headlights on and drive slowly.
  • Watch for emergency services personnel and follow their directions.
  • If you cannot see clearly, pull over, keep your headlights and hazard lights on, and wait until the smoke clears.
  • If you have a respiratory condition and you have been affected by smoke you should contact your local doctor or call Health Direct on 1800 022 222.
 
ROAD CLOSURES:
Avoid the area and be aware of fire and other emergency services personnel working on site.
 
WHAT FIREFIGHTERS ARE DOING:
Fire crews are on the scene.
 
EXTRA INFORMATION:
  • The incident was reported at 2.50pm today.
  • The cause of the fire is unknown.
  • People are asked to report any suspicious behaviour to Police Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
  • DFES is managing the fire.
 
KEEP UP TO DATE:
Visit www.dfes.wa.gov.au, call 13 DFES (13 3337), follow DFES on Twitter @dfes_wa or listen to news bulletins.
 
The next update will be provided by 11am Tuesday 29 July unless the situation changes.
 
Media Contact: DFES Media and Corporate Communications on 9225 5955.

Publication Time: 28/07/2014 4:00 PM

DP Review: In pictures: Restoration of Boeing's first 747 'jumbo jet'

DP Review (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 16:03 AWST)

The Boeing 747 - or the 'jumbo jet' as it is commonly known, changed the world. The 747 first flew in 1969, and transformed modern air travel with its ability to carry more people - and more cargo - across the globe than any previous airliner, shrinking it in the process. Seattle's Museum of Flight houses RA001 - the very first 747, which flew as a test airframe from its inaugural liftoff in 1969 through until the early 1990s. The museum is currently restoring RA001 both inside and out. Click through for pictures

DFES Emergency Alerts: Bushfire ADVICE for Great Northern Highway five kilometres north east of Willare Bridge Roadhouse in the Shire of Derby

DFES Emergency Alerts (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 15:45 AWST)

Category: Fire
Alert Summary: A bushfire ADVICE remains for people travelling along Great Northern Highway, five kilometres north east of Willare Bridge Roadhouse in the Shire of Derby, West Kimberley.
Content:
A bushfire ADVICE remains for people travelling along Great Northern Highway, five kilometres north east of Willare Bridge Roadhouse in the Shire of Derby, West Kimberley.
 
  • There is no threat to lives or homes but there is smoke across Great Northern Highway.
  • Although there is no immediate danger you need to be aware and keep up to date in case the situation changes.
  • The fire is burning in Yeeda Station, on the eastern side of Great Northern Highway.
 
BUSHFIRE BEHAVIOUR:
  • The bushfire is moving slowly in a west north westerly direction.
  • It is out of control and unpredictable.
 
WHAT TO DO:
  • Be extremely careful when driving through the area.
  • Turn your headlights on and drive slowly.
  • Watch for emergency services personnel and follow their directions.
  • If you cannot see clearly, pull over, keep your headlights and hazard lights on, and wait until the smoke clears
  • If you have a respiratory condition and you have been affected by smoke you should contact your local doctor or call Health Direct on 1800 022 222.
 
ROAD CLOSURES:
No roads are closed.

Avoid the area and be aware of fire and other emergency services personnel working on site.
 
WHAT FIREFIGHTERS ARE DOING:
 
DFES is monitoring the fire remotely.
 
EXTRA INFORMATION:
  • The cause of the fire is unknown.
  • DFES is managing the fire.
 
KEEP UP TO DATE:
Visit www.dfes.wa.gov.au, call 13 DFES (13 3337), follow DFES on Twitter @dfes_wa or listen to news bulletins.
 
The next update will be provided by 11am, Tuesday 29 July unless the situation changes.
 
 

Publication Time: 28/07/2014 3:40 PM

DFES Emergency Alerts: Bushfire ADVICE for Great Northern Highway, between Bidyadanga Road and Fraser Downs Road, in the Shire of Broome

DFES Emergency Alerts (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 15:33 AWST)

Category: Fire
Alert Summary: A bushfire ADVICE remains for people travelling on Great Northern Highway, between Bidyadanga Road and Fraser Downs Road, in the Shire of Broome.
Content:
A bushfire ADVICE remains for people travelling on Great Northern Highway, between Bidyadanga Road and Fraser Downs Road, in the Shire of Broome.

• There is no threat to lives or homes but there is a lot of smoke in the area.
• Although there is no immediate danger you need to be aware and keep up to date in case the situation changes.
• The fire is burning on the western side of Great Northern Highway.

BUSHFIRE BEHAVIOUR:
• The bushfire is moving slowly in a west north-westerly direction.
• It is out of control and unpredictable.
• The fire has burnt approximately 800 hectares.

IF DRIVING:
• Be extremely careful when driving through the area.
• Turn your headlights on and drive slowly.
• Watch for emergency services personnel and follow their directions.
• If you cannot see clearly, pull over, keep your headlights and hazard lights on, and wait until the smoke clears.
• If you have a respiratory condition and you have been affected by smoke you should contact your local doctor or call Health Direct on 1800 022 222.

ROAD CLOSURES:
No roads are closed.

Avoid the area and be aware of fire and other emergency services personnel working on site.

WHAT FIREFIGHTERS ARE DOING:
DFES and firefighters are monitoring the fire.
 
EXTRA INFORMATION:
• The cause of the fire is unknown.
• People are asked to report any suspicious behaviour to Police Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.
• DFES is managing the fire.

KEEP UP TO DATE:
Visit
http://www.dfes.wa.gov.au/, call 13 DFES (13 3337), follow DFES on Twitter @dfes_wa or listen to news bulletins.

The next update will be provided by 11am, Tuesday 29 July 2014 unless the situation changes.

Publication Time: 28/07/2014 3:30 PM

Slashdot: How Bird Flocks Resemble Liquid Helium

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 15:33 AWST)

sciencehabit (1205606) writes "A flock of starlings flies as one, a spectacular display in which each bird flits about as if in a well-choreographed dance. Everyone seems to know exactly when and where to turn. Now, for the first time, researchers have measured how that knowledge moves through the flock—a behavior that mirrors certain quantum phenomena of liquid helium. Some of the more interesting findings: Tracking data showed that the message for a flock to turn started from a handful of birds and swept through the flock at a constant speed between 20 and 40 meters per second. That means that for a group of 400 birds, it takes just a little more than a half-second for the whole flock to turn."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








DP Review: Travel tripods: 5 carbon fiber kits reviewed

DP Review (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 15:10 AWST)

What makes a tripod a good travel companion? We test out five carbon fiber 'travel' tripods that while compact and light, are also comfortably tall and capable of supporting a reasonable amount of gear. This review covers five models, examining their features, functions and ergonomics in use both in the studio and out in the field. Click through to read the roundup.

SC Magazine: NBN Co sets September FTTP service date for TPG areas

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 14:19 AWST)

Product to go live in two months.

GNOME Look: Root Folder Icon (GNOME Icon)

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 13:04 AWST)

Root Folder Icon
(GNOME Icon)
Root Folder Icon For Launching File Manager as Root or with sudo. Intended for File Managers that don\'t have separate icons for launching as root. I personally like to use this icon opposite the Gnome User Home icon for launching Thunar in regular and elevated modes.

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SC Magazine: Brandis' anti-piracy proposal won't work

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 12:08 AWST)

[Opinion] Forcing ISPs to punish users is not the solution.

EEV Blog: Graphene / Lithium Ion Capacitor Kickstarter BS

EEV Blog (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 12:05 AWST)


I’ve had a lot of people ask me to comment on THIS project in Kickstarter.

It was supposed to be a rechargeable battery based on Lithium Ion Capacitor technology.
Ok, cool, nothing wrong with that, sounds good. A guy has mated a Lithium Ion Capacitor with a small custom regulator and fitted it into a standard AA size battery holder.
It even has a nice novel quick charging ring on the outside (could it short out to something though?).

So it’s all looking quite neat until you read the specs where he claims the capacity is 1150 mAh, and can recharge in a claimed 30 seconds, and that’s when people started to call BS on this idea, and I was one of them.

I was going to do a video on this, because it’s fairly easy to read the DATASHEET for the cap and calculate the maximum charging rate and capacity of such a system.
Some people have already done this HERE and HERE.
Turns out that the capacity is going to be more than an order of magnitude less than the 1150mAh claimed! About 35mAh or thereabouts, about 1/30th of that claimed. And it can’t be charged in 30 seconds, it’ll take at least 60 seconds according to the datasheet max rating. You canna’ change the laws of physics Captain!

 

So this guy copped a whole host of deserved criticism about the capacity, but rather than provide test data he just said:

“As far as how long my battery will last, per charge, I can tell you this. I put one in a toy that my 1 year old daughter plays with every day, all day. It’s been in there for a week and it’s still going strong.

Oh dear. Huge red flag right there. You can’t throw out a capacity figure and not prove it with basic controlled tests.

But here is the kicker (pun intended), what does he say in response to all this technical criticism? Instead of providing the test data, or admit he simply got it wrong, he SPILLS THE BEANS on what the project is really about…

It’s a graphene capacitor!

He’s going to get a manufacturer to use his own home made graphene powder that he supplies them.

Well, ok, you can make your own graphene, and there is quite a deal of research going into graphene capacitors.

But he’s now gone from implying that he was using existing Lithium Ion Capacitors and needed the money to mass produce the PCBs, to now saying he needs $8K (80% of total) to pay the manufacturer to make these magical graphene capacitors for him, likely coated in pixie dust (my guess).

Woah, dude, you can’t do that! You can’t run a Kickstarter campaign claiming (or implying) one thing, and then completely changing the technology and what the risks are.

Why no mention of the graphene or anything like that in the original Kickstarter? Why no mention of the challenge of getting the capacitor manufactured? Why no mention of what you really wanted the money for?

And it gets funnier. Rather than provide the data to back up his capacity claim, he doubles down on the toy test:

If anyone thinks a child’s toy is a poor platform to use to test a batteries endurance, think about it this way. Children’s toys aren’t made to be energy efficient. They drain batteries quickly and the toy manufacturer probably has some sort of an agreement with battery manufacturers saying, “Give us a cut and we’ll make sure people have to buy lots and lots of batteries.” On top of that, it also gives the battery a chance to take the physical abuse of a 1 year old throwing the toy around.

Wow. No, sorry, that’s not how proper engineering tests are done on battery capacity. At the very least you need a defined load and to drain it to a specified voltage level, and get the resultant capacity graph.
Ok, a toy test is actually done by battery manufactuers, but it’s not recommended and that is why there are ANSI standards to simulate these things, and good manufacturers follow these in the their datasheets.
e.g. the standard “toy test” is 3.9ohm for 1hr/day

But ok, your battery uses a post regulator which will have a flat discharge curve. But at the very least you can do a system discharge of a known current vs time and plot it anyway. Without that, your talk is just that, useless drivel.
You are the one that came up with a figure of 1150mAh, tell us how you arrived at that figure?
If you can’t do any of that then you have no business being in the battery business.

So it is clear he either has no clue how to measure battery capacity, or doesn’t want to, or has done it and won’t release the results. So either clueless, hiding something, or running on wishful thinking.

Not to mention actually getting a capacitor manufacturer to make custom batteries for you using your own supplied material. I find that very hard to believe, and most likely not for $8K to a guy in his garage. But ok, I’ll assume you can do that.

This video of the charging and discharge testing is just SO CONVINCING!

Then he doubles down again with extra arrogance:

If, for some reason you don’t believe these claims, well, I invite you to pledge enough to get a battery and run it through your own rigorous tests. I’ve had 2 in one of my daughters toys for weeks now without recharging and it’s still going strong. Graphene capacitors haven’t yet reached the market, so, here is your chance to be one of the first.

No dude, that’s not how it work, unless you are targeting gullible people the burden of proof is on you to show the data that your graphene capacitor has the stated capacity.
Even more so that this is a custom capacitor usin your own magic mix.
You do actually have sample parts in hand right? Otherwise that should have been mentioned in the Risks & Challenges section.

At the very least this campaign should be closed for false representation of the risks and what it was about.

But the 2nd kicker is that even if this magic graphene capacitor can be produced, the best produced yet graphene based Lithiun Ion Capacitors at Monash University is 12 times higher than the best existing Lithium Ion Supercaps.
So even if this project used the cutting edge of graphene capacitor research in order to get increased capacity, it’s only going to get to maybe 420mAh at best (35mAh x 12). Still not close to the 1150mAh claimed.
Not to mention that the graphene supercaps still aren’t production ready yet.
But hey, a guy on kickstarter recons he can do it in his garage and by throwing $8K at a capacitor manufacturer. Yeah, no worries!

There is also an Instructable with, well, bugger all info.

Bottom line is this project stinks. It leads people into thinking it’s one thing (off-the-shelf cap) and then pulling a rabbit out the graphene hat when pressed on the details. And then refusing to provide any real world data. But most of all, the numbers simply don’t add up. The force is not strong with this one.
Stay clear!

Comments

Slashdot: Popular Android Apps Full of Bugs: Researchers Blame Recycling of Code

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 11:55 AWST)

New submitter Brett W (3715683) writes The security researchers that first published the 'Heartbleed' vulnerabilities in OpenSSL have spent the last few months auditing the Top 50 downloaded Android apps for vulnerabilities and have found issues with at least half of them. Many send user data to ad networks without consent, potentially without the publisher or even the app developer being aware of it. Quite a few also send private data across the network in plain text. The full study is due out later this week.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








SC Magazine: Defence contractor ditched over data offshoring

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 11:16 AWST)

Personnel info sent overseas since 2012.

SC Magazine: Queensland Ambulance prepares to go mobile

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 10:12 AWST)

Tablet app to enter production this year.

SC Magazine: Popular Android apps inherit bugs from recycled code

(posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 09:46 AWST)

Study reveals security concerns in top 50 list.

Slashdot: Newly Discovered Virus Widespread in Human Gut

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 08:35 AWST)

A newly discovered virus has been found by a San Diego State University team to live inside more than half of all human gut cells sampled. Exploring genetic material found in intestinal samples, the international team uncovered the CrAssphage virus. They say the virus could influence the behaviour of some of the most common bacteria in our gut. Researchers say the virus has the genetic fingerprint of a bacteriophage - a type of virus known to infect bacteria. Phages may work to control the behaviour of bacteria they infect - some make it easier for bacteria to inhabit in their environments while others allow bacteria to become more potent. [Study lead Dr. Robert] Edwards said: "In some way phages are like wolves in the wild, surrounded by hares and deer. "They are critical components of our gut ecosystems, helping control the growth of bacterial populations and allowing a diversity of species." According to the team, CrAssphage infects one of the most common types of bacteria in our guts. National Geographic gives some idea why a virus so common in our gut should have evaded discovery for so long, but at least CrAssphage finally has a Wikipedia page of its own.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Off the Florida Coast, Astronauts Train For Asteroid Mission

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 07:06 AWST)

Space.com gives an overview of the training that four astronauts are undergoing over 9 days submerged off the coast of Florida near Key Largo. The training mission, dubbed NEEMO 18, is one step toward a proposed (mid-2020s) mission to actually visit a captured asteroid in lunar orbit. In addition to the complications of working outside their school-bus sized habitat while awkwardly suited up in a low-gravity (or at least high buoyancy) environment, their mission also includes a 10-minute communications delay, to simulate the high-latency communications with mission control that would be inevitable for an actual asteroid mission. The experiments astronauts are doing during the mission, which began Monday (July 21), range from the physical to the behavioral. For example, each of the crew members sports a sensor that records how close the crew members work with each other inside the school-bus-size habitat. ... Communications with NEEMO Mission Control is usually constant, and there is the ability to send items to and from the habitat as needed. Also living inside the habitat are two support staff who are assisting with Aquarius maintenance and systems, as required. The crew members also have Internet and phone service to talk with family and friends.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Slashdot: Valencia Linux School Distro Saves 36 Million Euro

Slashdot (posted on Monday July 28, 2014 at 06:04 AWST)

jrepin (667425) writes "The government of the autonomous region of Valencia (Spain) earlier this month made available the next version of Lliurex, a customisation of the Edubuntu Linux distribution. The distro is used on over 110,000 PCs in schools in the Valencia region, saving some 36 million euro over the past nine years, the government says." I'd lke to see more efforts like this in the U.S.; if mega school districts are paying for computers, I'd rather they at least support open source development as a consequence.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.